7 Habits of Highly Successful Bloggers

highly-successful-bloggers“Some people dream of great accomplishments, while others stay awake and make them happen.”

It’s true. Some people are dreamers, and others are action tackers.

It’s true that we’re all different, but there are certain habits we can incorporate into our daily lives that can help us become better. …become better people, better readers, better writers and in this case, better bloggers.

Below are seven (7) habits that highly successful bloggers have incorporated into their lives and their work online. Take a look and see how many of these you can start incorporating into yours.

7 Habits of Highly Successful Bloggers

1. Understand The Needs of the Market

Bloggers have a higher chance of creating a successful website when they’re in tune with the needs of the people they are trying to serve. Remember that we are in the business of solving problems (and making money, too) – But, in order to make the money we want to make, we need to figure out how to make other people’s lives better.

The fastest way to get there is by understanding your market’s fears and frustrations, and creating content that helps them alleviate that pain.

2. Proofread Their Content

Successful bloggers take their content creation process seriously. They don’t like publishing crappy articles for the sake of adding content to their site.

They understand that there are real people reading the words they write. They understand that NOT proofreading their content could mean the difference between a home run piece of work, and just another post.

Think about that…

3. They Read… A Lot

Reading sparks ideas. Reading gets your mind going. If you’re stuck on what to write about next, I recommend grabbing anything to read:

  • a fiction novel
  • an industry blog
  • a celebrity gossip magazine
  • this blog :0)

Grab something and start reading.

4. Focus on Goals & Objectives

Successful bloggers focus on goals and objectives. They don’t linger with things that don’t matter much, like:

Successful bloggers make decisions quickly based on their goals. They don’t dwell on their past failures, and they keep moving forward no matter what.

5. Write For People… Not Search Engines

Search engines are important. I understand that. I get over 7,000 visits per month from Google alone and I love it. But the reason I’m getting these visits is not because of some secret SEO technique  or special plugin. The reason those visits are coming in is simply because I wrote those articles for human beings.

I wrote content that people could easily understand and consume. There’s no need to stuff your articles with keywords anymore. That kind of behavior is frowned upon. So write for people; you’ll get way better results that way.

6. Keep Track of Stats

Successful bloggers keep track of their statistics. They know what to look for and which statistics matter.

They try to figure out why a certain post got hundreds of retweets, while another post only received a few. They’re focused on the stats they can read and gather valuable information from, so that they can try to recreate that success.

7. But Don’t Obsess Over Stats

Obsessing over stats is also a bad habit and successful bloggers don’t do it. Once they’ve gathered the information they need, they move on to the next task on their list.

They understand that staring at their Google Analytics account is a waste of time – and very addictive.

What Success Habits Do You Have?

share them below… and then share this post with someone you think might benefit.

p.s Don’t forget to subscribe to the 8-part marketing course.

  • http://www.Social-Hire.com Tony Restell

    Great list of habits, thanks for sharing. I would add one other habit to the list – constantly seeking to engage with your readership. Whether it’s asking questions when tweeting the article, adding a call to action for people to comment on the article, responding when people do comment on the article… all these things make people feel like they are part of a community when reading your blog – and that you are an approachable person not some faceless publisher. This I’ve found increases reader loyalty, engagement and propensity to share your content – all good news for any blogger! Would you agree?

    • http://www.inboundpro.net/ Hector Cuevas

      Agree 1000% Tony. This is how bloggers move from having to promote their own stuff, to having their community spread the word for them. great point..

  • http://blog.bradbox.com Bradley

    I always have a notepad with me and as soon as I think of a topic to blog about, I add the topic to a list at the back of the pad. This means I always have something to write about when I have some time.

    • http://www.inboundpro.net/ Hector Cuevas

      Bradley.. me and you both. I have over 15 drafts inside wordpress right now – all from my little gray notepad. :0)

  • Churchill Madyavanhu

    Well, I still haven’t got any success to write home about. From the little I have seen so far, I believe writing for the readers and engaging with them in comments, twitter, etc., as well as persistence are habits that can bring good results. I am keeping my fingers crossed and hoping that your great tips will eventual bring success. :-)

  • http://niallgavinuk.blogspot.com Niall Gavin

    Well, six out of seven’s not so bad, I guess. I don’t have any sense of ‘the market’, nor do I think of myself as blogging for a particular monetised sector. I blog to reflect, to show up authentically and because I am interested in and know a little about a lot, and a lot about very little. If that’s of any interest to anyone else, that’s enough for me. But I totally agree about points 2 – 7!

  • http://www.jackdurish.com Jack Durish

    I wonder if I really am a blogger. I think that I’m more of a storyteller. I don’t know but I think that people may read my daily postings for entertainment rather than to be motivated or informed. I’m moderately concerned with traffic statistics. Well, I used to be. Then I began to wonder if a thousand visitors per day was good, bad, or indifferent. I don’t have anything to compare it with other than I’m doing better now than a year ago. Don’t mind me. Just musing aloud (well, in print).

  • http://smedio.com Douglas Idugboe

    Great list of habits Hector. Especially, number five, “Write for People”. No one disputes the importance of search engines, the sooner content creators realize search engines are looking for useful content they can serve to their users, the better it will be for us. The search-traffic ecosystem continues to feed off value rather than strategic application and positioning of words and phrases. As they said in the movie, The Field of Dreams, “build it, they will come”. In this context, if a blogger continues to produce valuable content for her readers, “they” will come.

    Great piece Hector.

    • http://www.inboundpro.net/ Hector Cuevas

      Thanks. And you’re so right. The search engines are getting better and better at filtering out the crap and giving the user exactly what they’re searching for. This is why it’s important to not only use the right keywords but also use related words that fall into the context of what we’re writing about. Just as if we were having a face to face conversation.

  • http://humanresourceleaders.blogspot.com/ Craig Garrett

    Great information! I’d add that I write regularly, but only post a percentage of my work. The process of writing helps me to develop my thoughts and message and often leads me to the blog that is worth sharing! Thank you for the great read and reminder!

    • http://www.inboundpro.net/ Hector Cuevas

      I’m with you in that one.. I also write daily.. But not everything I write is ready to be published. It just helps me hone my skills and gets my mind working. Thanks for sharing.

  • http://www.hippomsg.com/ Aron

    As a hobby blogger I also think it’s important to keep the “fun” in posting, and putting oneself on a schedule risk taking the fun out. Also on the other hand, as a blog reader of many different types of blogs some with very varied postings I find my life so much easier using a reader collecting all the RSS feeds.
    I think the point I want to make is that if you are not aiming to be a professional blogger, then don’t take yourself too serious and give your readers some credit, if they like your stuff they will keep coming back, if you don’t like your stuff they will notice and not come back.

  • http://www.confessionsoftheprofessions.com Matthew

    I recent just started an Open Blog where anyone can post personal stories. It’s provides valuable content and people are able to share their personal stories anonymously, if they choose, which has so far been fairly successful.

    I am guilty of #7. On all my blogs. I have to train myself to look once or twice per day, and I tell myself: It’s going to be alright. It’s just a month old.. still in its infancy. Some of my other sites, though not mine, and run for clients.. are getting thousands of hits per day, and hundreds of unique hits daily.

    If you build it, they will come is not exactly true anymore, but with a good content, a Facebook account, a few friends, and a Google Webmaster account, you can go a long way. And most of all.. blogs need to come to the age of maturity. Very seldom does someone start a blog that is an instant overnight success, unless its endorsed by a celebrity, public figure, or news media outlet.

    I’ve been researching a lot about successful blogs.. thank you for your article. When building a blog, the main thing to focus on is quality content that is interesting and people can relate to it, above all else.

    The uniqueness of quality content is that if you change the perspective of your focus on each of the topics you present, regardless of how many other pages covered those same topics, you give your readers a whole different aspect and way of thinking, making you far superior to those who tend to write about the same bland topics, same advice, etc.